Wellness Tea

Echinacea is a beautiful flower in the herb or perennial garden.  We are lucky enough to have the purple cone flowers dotting several of our beds.  Not only is it a lovely friend to enjoy in the garden, when dried, the flowers and roots have healing and immune boosting properties.

The girls and I dig Echinacea root with our friends every fall so both families have a winter’s supply of dried flowers and roots for tea and tincture.

If you don’t have Echinacea in your garden, no worries, it’s easily found in natural food stores. When anyone feels the first sign of a cold coming on, this is the first things that goes on the stove.

Wellness Tea
2 quarts water
2/3 cup lemon juice from organic lemons; about 3 lemons
9 slices ginger root, 1/8-inch thick
2/3 cup local honey
5 or 6 pieces dried Echinacea root and flowers (use several drops of tincture per mug as a substitute)

Bring the water, ginger root, and Echinacea root to a boil in a large pot over medium-high heat. If you are using Echinacea tincture reserve this until you pour your steaming mug of tea. Reduce the heat to barely a simmer for 30 minutes. Turn off the heat and add lemon juice and honey. Sip all day long as desired, heating up each time. Strain any tea you don’t drink over the day into a glass jar and place in the refrigerator overnight.

Makes 2 quarts

Crinner 2017

As the season comes to an end, we always find a fun way to celebrate our summer together. Often it involves a bit of food and drink and sitting leisurely around the table together. Sometimes that’s been pizza and bowling and other times it’s been ice cream for dinner followed by a movie. I’ve always wanted to do an escape room or a paint ball fight, but that will have to wait for another time.

This year’s Crinner (crew + dinner) included a wine tasting (while we all pretended to be grown ups) from the Wine Seller and eating a dinner that not one of us made, catered by Café Miranda. It was the perfect way to end a wonderful year.

A huge thanks goes out to all of the crew and volunteers who helped end our season well. Shout out to Sam and Lindsey for taking a day off of their “real jobs” to come help schlep boxes and more boxes.  Shout out to Donna Anderson, our super good friend, for her wine expertise and inspiration.  Shout out to our crew – you are forever part of the Riggin‘s history!  Thanks for taking such good care of our girl!

The array of wine. We chose approachable wines that were classics. No blends here.
The array of wine. We chose approachable wines that were classics. No blends here.  Also, they aren’t in order yet in this photo (just in case there are any of you out there who are detail driven 🙂 )
First crack at the cheese board! The cheese board master, Chives, gets to go first!
First crack at the cheese board! The cheese board master, Chives, gets to go first!
Whites first.
Whites first.  Oops, that Seghesio Zinfandel was at the very end – and AWESOME!
Reds next and port to finish.
Reds next and port to finish.
Joisting with micro-planers gifted by Betsy.
Jousting with micro-planers gifted by Betsy.
We all fit at the table!
We all fit at the table!

New Cookbook!

Announcing Sugar and Salt: Book Two -The Orange Book!  This collection of recipes from my galley and home kitchen will arrive at our door step (or barn step) soon!  Here’s a look at the process….

Photo by Rocky Coast Photography
Over the past several months we’ve been getting serious about producing a cookbook, so we made a lot of food.
Photo by Rocky Coast Photography
Some of it was chocolate! And delicious.
Photo by Rocky Coast Photography
Some of it was healthy. And delicious!
Photo by Rocky Coast Photography
When we couldn’t hold all of the pieces in our head any longer, we posted it all over the office walls.
Photo by Rocky Coast Photography
We got to knit. And made a Ball jar cozy (several actually) using Mim Bird‘s pattern.
Photo by Rocky Coast Photography
Occasionally, we made cocktails. They were well timed.
Then Elizabeth made them look pretty in photos.
Then Elizabeth made them look pretty in photos.
Photo by Rocky Coast Photography
And then we drank them.
Photo by Rocky Coast Photography
Some of us had lemonade instead. And also, one of us got confused.
Photo by Rocky Coast Photography
Then we made Brussels sprouts that were so good we almost didn’t get the photo (because we ate them all while standing at the stove).
Photo by Rocky Coast Photography
A lot of words got written and someone had to take a doggie break.
Photo by Rocky Coast Photography
And then there was more food.

Annie
Now that was fun!

Click Sugar and Salt to order.

Fresh Sea Breeze Cocktail with Homemade Cranberry Syrup

It’s a cranberry time of year when the brilliant burgundy globes garnish plates and glasses galore.  This cocktail was inspired by a delicious cranberry syrup made with leftover cranberries from Thanksgiving.

And then the box of citrus came from Florida filled with juicy, plump grapefruits, and well, Capt. “needed” a cocktail after a long day down at the boat and… Now we all have a wonderful recipe to share with friends.

Fresh Sea Breeze cocktail Photo by Rocky Coast Photography

Fresh Sea Breeze
1 1/2 ounces Cold River Vodka
3 ounces fresh grapefruit juice
1 1/2 ounces cranberry syrup (see recipe below)
ice for serving
3 cranberries in syrup as garnish
ice for serving
1 candied grapefruit peel as garnish

Add ice to an old-fashioned glass. Pour vodka and grapefruit juice over the ice and stir. Add the cranberry syrup and let it fall to the bottom of the glass. Garnish with cranberries and lime wheel.

Makes 1 cocktail

Cranberry Syrup
2 cups fresh cranberries
2 cups sugar
3 cups water

Bring all ingredients to a boil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer until the cranberries all “pop” and release their juices. Cool and store in a covered jar in the refrigerator for up to one month.

Makes 4 cups

Annie
Cranberry merriment

Holiday Gifts from the Riggin and Annie’s Kitchen – Part 2

Two more thoughts for holiday gifts… I mean, it’s still early for those procrastinators out there, so no time like the present, People!

I’ve been in love with these Giovani wine glasses for a couple of years.  Now they come with the Riggin logo on them.  Cool, huh?

In addition, we’ve got a new look at an old classic, the coffee/tea mug.  Nice and big with a decent-sized handle.  Click on over to the ship store or call us for more details!

wineglass2 Mug

Annie
Much merriment and happiness to you all.

Cocktails – In Good Company

On a sunny day in March (they are happening more and more frequently), Elizabeth and I left the office for a cocktail adventure.  Sometimes work is so HARD!  As we entered the back door of In Good Company, one of my favorite restaurants in Rockland; well… in Maine; well… anywhere, we were greeted by Melody Wolfertz, owner and chef, and an unusual sound found in restaurants – quiet.

As she led us to the patina-ed walnut bar, she started right in, filling the quiet with the sounds of a restaurant – the click of ice falling into bar glasses, the dull chime of spirit bottles bumping up next to each other as they are pulled from shelves and amidst it all, the chatter of engaged creativity on my favorite subjects – food and cocktails.  We spent a good deal of time talking about flavor profiles, the wonderful freshness and ingenuity that has literally and figuratively infused the cocktail world over the past decade, and what she thinks about when she’s making a well-balanced cocktail.

The full recipe and article will be out in the May issue of Maine Spirits, but in the meantime, here’s a look at our fun afternoon together.

IGC Interview6.blog
A captivating array of bitters by the Fee Brothers and our local Sweet Grass Winery.
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Sharing The In Good Company, a Negroni and several botanicals.
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Talking, learning, sipping, and having fun!
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The In Good Company, a rif on a cosmo, made with rhubarb syrup and blueberry bitters.
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Ice ball made on site for those who like their spirits cold and only slightly watered.
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The bar at In Good Company in Rockland, Maine. You should go!

Annie
Sometimes a girls gotta work REEAL hard

The Baggywrinkle Cocktail – A Little Bourbon, A Little Pear Nectar…

This Easter, it being chilly and complete with a tiny dusting of snow, we set the menu accordingly and served lamb and several hearty accompaniments such as homemade baguette, rosemary roasted red and purple potatoes and roasted asparagus. As has become the new norm, I offered all comers to our Easter dinner a cocktail. This time, I had on hand fresh grapefruit juice, pear nectar and mango syrup. At first, people were sort of quizzical about a cocktail made with pear nectar, but by the end of the afternoon, as one person followed another, everyone, to a person, choose the pear nectar. Even my friend, who loves red wine, put the wine down for a while to sip on her own pear nectar cocktail.

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This cocktail is technically a shrub, a cocktail made with vinegar-ed syrup, due to the white balsamic. With Jack Rudy Cocktail Co. aromatic bitters, a Cranberry and Pear White Balsamic Vinegar from Fiore and home made pear nectar I created what we called The Baggywrinkle – a cocktail with a wonderful balance of sweet and spirit, sour and bitter.

For those who are not boat people, baggywrinkles are handmade chafe gear that look a little bit like furry logs. They are affixed to the topping lifts (You might not know what this is either, but it’s the wire that holds up the boom. If you don’t know what a boom is, might as well skip to the cocktail instead.) and prevent sharp bits of wire from creating a hole in the sails. This shrub is about the same manila or natural color as most baggywrinkles and because of the pear nectar, is actually has a little textural feel to it that could perhaps be described as, well, furry, if you wanted to stretch it, which I do because I’ve been wanting to call a cocktail The Baggywrinkle for some time now.

The Baggywrinkle

The Baggywrinkle
1 1/2 ounces Jim Beam Bourbon
3 ounces pear nectar
1/2 teaspoon Fiore Cranberry and Pear White Balsamic Vinegar
1/2 a dropper of Jack Rudy Cocktail Co. aromatic bitters
ice for shaking and for the glass
slice of pear

Chill an Old-Fashioned glass with ice cubes. Combine the bourbon, pear nectar, vinegar, and bitters in a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Strain into the chilled Old-Fashioned glass, garnish with pear slice and serve.

Makes 1 cocktail

Annie
Cocktails for Easter!

Canning Pear Nectar

This fall, I was the surprised recipient of a beautiful bushel of pears from what we think is a Seckle Pear tree. That gift, however, did not come co-bundled with an abundance of time. I was determined that this gift would not sit too long while I put it off until the pears were passed perfectly ripe and had moved into “uh oh.”

HomegrownPears1

To hustle along, I decided to not can them as whole pears, but as nectar. Making nectar is a much easier process than canning whole fruit, as it does not require peeling. It begins with making a loose pear sauce much the same way one would apple sauce by bringing to a simmer pear quarters and water and cooking until the pears are either tender or falling apart. Pear varieties will differ in whether they stay together once they are fully cooked or fall apart – just like apples.

With the addition of lemon juice and sugar plus a hot pack canning process, pear nectar emerges. I’ll use it all winter long in smoothies instead of honey, as a juice for brunch, a foundation for mixed drinks, combined with ginger ale for a special drink for the girls and, well, I let you know what else I come up with!

Annie
Thank you, friend Glen. I’m glad we are both good at sharing.

Spinach Smoothie – Green AND Tasty

A good friend of mine often shows up to our meetings together with her breakfast – a bright green drink so brilliant, it’s hard to know how she got it to be that green.  We are talking neon, nuclear green.   So one day, I asked her.  Spinach, she says, is the key, without the purple or red colored fruits which muddy the hue.  She then goes on to tell me that she adds kale, celery, cucumber and cilantro to her morning beverage.  I’m skeptical.  Until I try it.  It’s actually not that bad… and then I get used to it and it’s pretty good… and then I look forward to it.

There are mornings when I feel I’m drinking salad, but hey, I feel good, it tastes good and my pants like it too.  Win, win!  This one is one of my favorites and for more smoothies, click on over to the Maine Ingredient.

I’m not sure what I’ll do when we go sailing and the cord for the blender doesn’t reach the plug on shore.  Maybe Jon will rig up a human run generator where everyone can take a few spins around the deck while the blender is going and then we roll it up until the next morning.  Or maybe I’ll just have an apple for breakfast.

GreenSmoothie

Spinach, Celery, Kiwi Smoothie
2 cups lightly packed spinach
5 ounces partially peeled cucumber; about 1/3 of a cucumber
1 stalk celery
1 peeled kiwi
1/2 ripe banana
1 cup water
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon raw honey

Add all ingredients to a blender or food processor and blend until completely combined and smooth.

Makes 3 cups

Annie
Salad, it’s what’s for breakfast

Cook the Book: Hot Chocolate

I’ve found that this is a real treat for little ones when you use semi-sweet chocolate; grown-ups usually prefer bittersweet.

3 cups whole milk
3 ounces bittersweet or semi-sweet chocolate, finely chopped or grated

Heat the milk in a saucepan over medium-high heat until it is just ready to boil.  Put the chocolate in a blender and pour in the hot milk. Allow the mixture to sit for 10-15 seconds, so the chocolate begins to melt; cover securely, place a folded towel over the lid, and blend until completely mixed and frothy, about 30 seconds. Serve with marshmallows.

Makes 3 servings.