Cooking with Annie: Episode 12 – Chicken Broth

Homemade chicken broth is one of those magical flavor boosters that just isn’t replicable with base, paste, or even store bought broth.  While those all work well out of necessity, once a taste of homemade chicken broth has hit your soup, it’s hard to go back.  Or at least hard not to notice the difference.  In this episode, we show you how to make broth from bones that were part of a chicken dinner and in a future episode, we’ll talk about what to do with any leftover meat to make a third meal.

If you missed the two soup episodes using up leftovers, they are here:  Carrot, Coconut, Ginger Soup and Creamy Potato Soup.

We’ve already talked about how to roast a whole chicken, and the next step is to take those leftover bones and all of the innards from the chicken – heart, liver, and gizzard – and add them to a stew pot.  Add a carrot, an onion with the peel, and a stalk of celery and cover everything with several inches of water.  Bring the pot to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and simmer for at least 45 minutes to an hour.  This sort of broth doesn’t take as long as full on chicken stock made with a whole, uncooked chicken.  The bones have already released some of their flavor and if you cook the broth too long, it begins to loose some of it’s wonderful flavor.  Lastly, strain the entire pot in a colander set over another pot and let drain.  Discard all of the bones and vegetables and store the broth in the refrigerator for up to a week or in the freezer (labeled and dated please!) for upto 6 months.

Annie
Happy cooking!

Cooking with Annie: Episode 6 – Roasted Tomato, Pepper, and Onion Omelette

Yesterday I spent the day outside in the light and warmth – listening to the birds and breathing fresh air.  While I was in the garden, walking wheelbarrow after wheelbarrow of wood chips from the large pile out in the front yard to the walkways in and around the garden out back, I found myself repeating a mantra to myself.  As there is so much that is not within my control right now, my mind moved to all of the things of which I am in charge and do control.

I am in charge of the food I choose to eat.  I am responsible for how I move my body each day.  I can choose to be outside no matter what the weather.  I am the one who chooses what I buy or don’t buy.  I am the one who is in charge of how I treat my family, the kindnesses I offer others, the way I greet my fellow humans.  I can choose to wait before I speak.  I choose grace.  I choose intention.  I choose surrender.

The word surrender has a connection to the phrase, “I quit”.  But that’s not what I mean.  I surrender to the things I cannot change.  I surrender to peace – in my mind and in my space.  I surrender to something greater than myself.

And I felt better.  And continued to walk the heavy wheelbarrow of wood chips to the garden – creating new pathways and adding a layer of freshness to the already worn paths.  And I felt better.

Annie
safe, calm, kind

Cooking with Annie: Episode 4 – Using up Leftovers = Potato Soup

Since we are all cooking at home more, there’s got to be some leftovers happening in those kitchens of yours.  Before they get shoved to the back of the fridge, become a science experiment, and then head to the compost pile, what if we talked about how you can turn those little bits of this and that into another meal?

Now, more than ever, being creative with what we have on hand makes good sense.  Maybe you lost your job and you need to be really frugal about what’s happening in your household right now.  Or maybe you’ve got more people or fewer people in your house than normal (more if your kids or parents are with you, less if you are social distancing by yourself).  Perhaps you are only going to the grocery store once every two weeks.  Probably more than one of these is true for you.  No matter how the corona shutdown is affecting you, the practice of using up leftovers is a good one to bring back or begin for the first time.

How to actually accomplish using up leftovers without having the same meal again and again, is a little bit of an art, but also there are some basic guidelines.  In this episode I talk about a couple of basic steps for making soup.

  1. Pick three things in your refrigerator that you think will go together in a soup and cut them up into soup-sized pieces.
  2. Dice and sauté about 1 cup of onions unless you have leftover onions in the fridge and then use up those first.
  3. When the onions are soft, add the cut up leftovers.
  4. Add about 4 cups of water or broth to the pot and bring to a simmer.
  5. Check for salt and pepper and either serve as a chunky, rustic soup or puree in a blender for a more elegant result.
  6. Add any garnishes that will go – think leftover fresh herbs, stale bread for croutons, a few minced nuts, or some kind of dairy like grated cheese or creme fraiche.

In our family, even BC (before covid-19), we would do this once every week or every other week.  When the girls were little and taking lunch to school, we’d heat up some broth and add leftover noodles and veggies with perhaps a little chicken and this would be their lunch soup.

In any event, this is just one of many ways to use up leftovers and over the next several weeks I’ll be sharing more.  Hope you find it helpful!

Annie
#staysafe #becalm #bekind