Edible Maine – Three Squares at Sea

Fantastic articles about the J. & E. Riggin just keep coming. I don’t know what else to say about this write-up in Edible Maine, except I love the story, I love the photos, I love everything about this article. You can read “Three Squares at Sea”  out online or order a copy from the Edible Maine website.

Recipes included in the article are Garden Carrots and Leeks Au Gratin, Clementine Walnut Bread, and Peach Ginger Jam.  You can find some of these recipes in At Home. At Sea – The Red Book, 2nd Edition.

Thank you Claire Jeffers, Douglas Merriam, and Edible Maine!

It’s Almost Sailing Time!

The sun is out, the wind is up, the days are long, and it’s time to go sailing.  With less than a week before we board, our army of workers is steadily and happily working towards getting out there on the bay.  Orders of food are arriving daily and the garden is nearly completely planted for the season with protective hoops and plastic for the basil, tomatoes and peppers.  This can be a very hectic time of year.  I am trying to write all of my columns and blog posts for the summer before we leave the dock in addition to organizing the end of the girls’ school year.  With all of this going on, we have to remind ourselves to take deep breaths of warm air, to lift our un-scarved faces to the sun, and to take our lunch in the grass or on the deck.

Soon the view out of my “office” will be granite-studded islands and wide expanses of water.  We are all so looking forward to being out there…. You should come too!

Annie
June – long, gorgeous days of summer

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Timberwind Moves to Belfast!

One calm Sunday in April, the crew of the Riggin and the Timberwind moved our new pretty schooner up Penobscot Bay to her new home in Belfast, Maine.  The day started calm and then picked up to a feisty 25 knots of breeze on the beam, but for a spring day in Maine, this is still a fairly low key day on the bay.  As the sun was closing out the day, our crews celebrated their efforts.  To top it all off, the Bangor Daily News was kind enough to highlight the Timberwind‘s new life.

Celebrating a good day together.
Celebrating a good day together.
Quarter view of a pretty boat and a pretty town.
Quarter view of a pretty boat and a pretty town.
Cassie.  Knitting.  On a boat.  Two of the best things in life.
Cassie. Knitting. On a boat. Two of the best things in life.
Save and sound at her new dock, Thompson's Wharf in Belfast, Maine.
Save and sound at her new dock, Thompson’s Wharf in Belfast, Maine.

Annie
Thank you, Belfast, for your welcoming ways

Sailing Our Tiny Schooner

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Getting ready to go. Lugsails are easy to rig.
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Chloe hanging out and manning the foresail sheet.
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Papa and Ella steering.
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Focus. Focus.

Because our fall was so incredibly warm, we were able to take Iolaire, our cute new schooner, out for a test drive before we put her away for the winter.  The day was our last gorgeous, warm, fall day.  At first when she heeled, I had this instinctive reaction of a little clench in my gut, thinking what’s on the stove, what’s on the tables, where are the flowers? And then? I REMEMBERED, I’m not on the big schooner and nothing is on the tables because there are no tables. I enjoyed the sailing just for the sailing. I watched the day go by and it was blissful.

It was the first time in 24 years that I’ve been on a sail boat without the responsibility of cooking a single thing. Not coffee. Not muffins. Not dinner. Nothing. I gotta tell ya, it’s different. Now I know why so many of you like sailing with us so much! It’s FUN!

Perhaps this sounds odd coming from someone who sails all summer long, but as one of our apprentices this summer put it, “It’s such a bummer that what makes [working on] deck awesome is the same thing that makes [working in the] galley insane.” Imagine the schooner heeling over as she catches a southwest summer breeze to windward – the wind in your face and the sound of the hull as she powers through the water. Then imagine the galley, nothing on the tables or counters and everything completely stowed (because if it’s not, it will launch itself onto the sole). Imagine trying to bake a cake or pie when the boat is heeled that much, or cook a stew when it’s sliding across the top of the stove. Yup, you get why great sailing days are not always the greatest galley days.  And even with all of that, any day on a boat, whether it’s in the galley or not, is a good day.

However, a small boat with no galley? Pretty fun!

Annie
I fell in love with sailing all over again.

Welcome to Our Fleet, Schooner Timberwind!

Merry Christmas to us!

All summer long Jon and I could see the Schooner Timberwind from the deck of the Riggin.  We would say to each other that someone should buy that boat.  She’s so pretty.  She deserves a new life.  But when we said “someone” we were NOT meaning us.

However, life had other plans and within a short time after our season ended, we found ourselves on another schooner adventure as the owner of not one, but two Maine windjammers!   We are the proud owners of the Schooner Timberwind.

There is still a lot to figure out, but we do know that she’ll be run as a daysailer from a Midcoast town by our former Mate, Lance Meadows.  The rest is yet to be confirmed and we’ll look forward to sharing more, when we, ourselves, discover it!

Schooner Timberwind by Rocky Coast Photograhy

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Annie
Our fleet expands yet again

Iolaire – We Bought a Tiny Schooner

We’d like to introduce you to the newest boat in our fleet.  Meet Iolaire (pronounced yawl’-a-rah), which means “eagle” in Gaelic. She is a Scottish sixern, a Shetland Island fishing boat.  The sixern is descended from the Norse seksæring, meaning six-oared boat – ancestor of the schooner.

Iolaire only has four oars and is a standing lug-rigged schooner.  Her masts are nearly equal in height and both are removable for easy storage.

Built in 1984 for Dr. Kenneth Leighton, author of Oar and Sail (Creekstone Press, 1999), she was also once owned by Maynard Bray’s grandson.  We found her in Vermont and she made her way to us this fall.

Our hope is that she’ll be a more stable small boat that we can launch once the big schooner is at anchor – for those who didn’t get enough sailing during the day.

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Isn’t she pretty?!